publishing

Let's Hear it For Imagination!

The secret ingredient in these desserts? Imagination.

The secret ingredient in these desserts? Imagination.

I have lot of friends in the publishing business. Lots. And I meet a lot of people in that world as well. Years ago, when my children’s book first came out, I was talking to a woman who said she worked for a publisher of textbooks. She told me that her company had a policy of not using the word “imagination” in their textbooks because they feared that books using that word will not be bought in some U.S. school districts.

She explained that the word was too closely associated in some people’s minds with the word magic, which, if you recall the debates about the Harry Potter books back when they were first published, is a literary hot potato for many people.

You could say that I’m fascinated by magic in all its forms—as make-believe performance, as real-life pagan ritual, as literary device. I was a huge magic geek as a kid. I still have the wand and tote bag of tricks that I trot out every time the unsuspecting child of a neighbor has a birthday party. Several of the blogs I follow these days are written by modern-day witches. And one of my long-time pet projects is a series of fantasy novels featuring rich magic systems.

That said, I actually get the objection-to-magic thing, I really do. I don’t like that people feel that way, but I can live with their objection if they can live with mine. But banning your child from ever reading, hearing, or seeing the word IMAGINATION—the Old French origin of the world means “to picture to oneself”—seems crazy to me. I’d argue you need more imagination to ban the word IMAGINATION for all the harm it will do your kid. The most successful adults I know did not grow up in an imagination-free zone.

I wonder if my acquaintance’s employer was the only company to enact such a policy. Since I first heard this anecdote back in 2011, I haven’t been able to confirm what I was told, nor have I ever been able to find a news article from a reputable source confirming this person’s assertion. It’s entirely possible my acquaintance was full of it, but then again, this is not the sort of policy a textbook publisher would voluntarily release to the news media.

Just in case the policy is true, here are couple of copies of the word. Please feel free to copy and paste into your favorite textbook of choice. Give a few to some wonderful kids, and to some boring adults who need it badly while you’re at it.

IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION. IMAGINATION.

There. Now don’t you feel better?


Yes, I am trying to post here more often. Thank you for noticing. If you want to sign up for my newsletter and claim your collection of free ebooks, go here. Thanks!

The Stark Truth

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Several years ago I heard that the University of Chicago was reprinting some of Donald Westlake’s old Richard Stark novels, both in print and as ebooks. I snapped up one of the ebooks during a heavily promoted “event” where they were offering one of the titles at the low, low price of free.

I’ve been trying to read more ebooks to reduce the amount of clutter in my home. I also like that when I’m on vacation or on the road, I can carry hundreds of books with me on one device.  I was looking forward to enjoying the Stark novel. That series, featuring master thief Parker, is known as the quintessential heist series in the crime fiction world.

But I was shocked by the number of typos I found in that Kindle edition. This happens whenever a publisher scans an old book that has never been digitized, and then uses OCR (optical character recognition) software to convert that image into text. You really have to proofread the resulting text very carefully because even good software will read the original text incorrectly. I went through this on a minor level when I recently scanned one of my old manuscripts—a pre-MS Word manuscript—and found that every instance of the letters “rn” as in “horn” was converted to the single letter “m.” If you squint real hard at the letters “rn,” you can kinda, sorta see how that might happen.

Anyway, the problems I spotted in the Stark novel were so bad and pervasive that I was actually moved to write the hallowed University of Chicago Press. To my surprise, they wrote me back. Here is our exchange. I’ve redacted the contact’s name and email.

From: Joe


Sent: Monday, October 31, 2011 7:40 AM


To: [Publicity, U of Chicago Press]


Subject: Richard Stark novels (problems)



Hi:



I have never written a letter like this.


I recently downloaded a Kindle edition of one of your Richard Stark novels, and was amazed by the number of typos I found in the text. Westlake was a fine writer, and I'm delighted that U. of Chicago Press is reprinting these old books. But someone has to proof them before they go out the door. I’m an author/editor myself, so I am especially aware of these sorts of problems. But still: they were unavoidable and frequent. 

Some of these problems looked like scanning errors. The word “I’ll” showed up several times as “111,” as if the text of an original paperback was scanned improperly into your system but not caught by a live editor. Other times, I’d find words such as “we’ll” written as “well,” and often the first word of sentences was uncapitalized.

This pretty basic stuff, but I don't feel comfortable buying more of the books until I know for sure that this problem has been corrected across the board. I’m told that a lot of Westlake’s older paperback originals had typos but that isn't an excuse. I can’t imagine that U. of Chicago Press is trying to reproduce the texts of these books exactly as they once appeared. That’s ludicrous. It seems more likely that someone was rushing to meet a deadline and didn't proof the Kindle editions. I notice a few other comments on Amazon’s websites that lead me to believe that this is pervasive throughout the series. I wouldn’t consider buying the print versions either, for the same reason.

 Can you let me know when/if the problem is fixed? I plan to buy them all. Just not yet.

 — Joe

On Oct 31, 2011, at 11:09 AM, they wrote back:


Dear Joe, 


Thank you for emailing to bring this issue to our attention. We do very much care about the quality of our print and e-books and I appreciate that you have made us aware of the problems you found. The older titles are more difficult to convert than the newer titles for which we have live files and editors freshly familiar with the text, so it does not surprise me that the conversion process caused errors, but it does concern me that they were not caught. 

I agree with you that the kinds of errors you are describing seem to be the sort that come from the conversion process. I’d like to look into this issue further. Could you tell me the title of the book that you purchased so I can have it reviewed? Once we have looked at the book you emailed about, we will check some of the others to which may have similar errors that were missed.

Sincerely, 
[redacted]

So I wrote back:

 The one I downloaded was “The Score.”

 But by poking around online, I found some other references to typos in at least two other titles. There’s this link, where someone writes:

“After reading another post like this, I reported 7 or 8 typos in “Butcher’s Moon” by Richard Stark. I also mentioned I would not be averse to a store credit for my efforts.”

 I found this comment at this link:

Letting Amazon know about typos/errors in Kindle books works. I pointed out 26 typos in a book and Amazon removed it indefinitely until the publisher fixes it. And they gave me 5$. : kindle

 And then, on Amazon, I found this review of the Stark book entitled “The Seventh”:

 4.0 out of 5 stars Who edited the Kindle edition?!  September 10, 2011

Amazon Verified Purchase

This review is from: The Seventh (Parker Novels) (Kindle Edition)

So many typos. I feel like I’m reading German “die” for “the” and often “w” for “v”. Great novel, but—if we are going to pay $10 for an electronic copy—please take the time to make it readable.

Again, I’m really sorry to contact you about this. I hope you will get this sorted out. I know this is a big effort, re-releasing these old books. I know a lot of fans are watching them closely.

 All best, Joe

That was was all from my end. My last note from the publisher was this:

Dear Joe,

Thanks so much—especially for sending the other comments as well!

 As a warning, it may be a couple months before this is sorted out since we have to work around the schedule of our new books. And, once again, thank you for taking the time to let us know about these.

Best wishes,

[redacted]

There you have it. I should note that I’m a terrible copy editor and proofreader of my own work. (Go ahead and look. I’m sure there are typos in this very post.) And I have been as long as I’ve been working in publishing, which is knocking on three decades at this point. That’s why I hire editors to review my books before I self-pub them. But here’s something people don’t like to admit: Even my traditionally published books have typos.

I once visited the offices of a friend who happened to be a literary agent. He was aggravated that week by a disaster that had happened with one of the books he repped and sold to a Big Five publisher. It was a nonfiction book about rock music. He flipped to a page and held up the volume. Near the bottom of the page, where there was supposed to be a photo and caption, there was nothing but a caption and a thin border where the photo was supposed to be.

“How did that happen?” I said.

He shook his head. “But they’re pubbing thousands of books a year and they apparently can’t bother to give a sh*t.”

Humans miss stuff all the time, even the experts. When people point out those typos to me, I try to have them fixed. It’s easier in the case of my self-pubbed books, trickier in the case of books pubbed by major publishers.

But here’s a highly touted line of books put out by the people who invented the freaking Chicago Manual of Style that appears not to have been proofread very well across the board. If there are shocking errors in three Kindle editions, as suggested by the notes above, they’re probably pervasive throughout the series.

In the long-running and by now uninteresting debate of traditional pub vs. self-pub, indie authors have been urged to be as professional as possible. Have someone edit your work, they’re told. Get a professional cover done. Have the book professionally formatted. And so on. Some of them do, some of them don’t.

I gotta say: I continue to be impressed by the work of authors whose books I’m proud to recommend to friends and even buy for family members.

Based on the Stark incident and a few others I’ve encountered in traditional publishing, I’m now convinced that a conscientious indie author can produce a better product than publishing professionals, who are routinely “swamped” and not personally invested in the final product.

It’s been seven years. I wonder if they’ve gotten the typos sorted out by now. I’ve been meaning to circle back and read those, but there’s always other books to read.

What do you think?


* This post first appeared in slightly different form on my old blog, November 16, 2011.

Yes, I am trying to post here more often. Thank you for noticing. If you want to sign up for my newsletter and claim your free ebook, go here. Thanks — Joseph D’Agnese

Quick 'n' Dirty News

I promised myself that this blog wouldn’t be so Denise-centric this time around, but I feel I ought to mention that her paperback hit the same three bestseller lists (NYT, NPR, Indie) in its second week. She was home this past weekend, but left quickly after for the great Midwest. She’ll be back Friday.

Meanwhile, our agent was able to sell the ghostwriting project I was working on to a Big 5 publisher. So it looks like I’ll have a paying gig for 2014, after all. They’re excited, and so is our Author. It’s his first book and he’s really itching to get started. We’re shooting for a September 1 delivery date.

For me, that means hammering out just how I’ll arrange my schedule to incorporate interviews with the Author, writing and research time for his book, and of course writing time for my own projects. Nevertheless, knowing I have a project on deck means a lot, believe me. Sometimes I just look forward to the predictability of journalistic research and interviews.

They announced the winners of the 2014 Derringer Awards early this morning, and my shortlisted story, “Bloody Signorina,” was not among them. (It remains free here for the time being. I hope to publish it more formally soon, with an alternate ending and some other extras.)

Even so, being nominated has been a beautiful experience, and I’m happy to see the work of some of my new friends—among them longtime short story writer Robert Lopresti—among the winners.

Bummer—or not?

I just found out this week that one of the books I wrote for a ghostwriting client will not be issued in paperback. The publisher, a Big 5, just didn’t think the hardcover and e-book sales were good enough to warrant a paperback release.

I was bummed, but the client is taking it better than I am. You’d think that after the publisher paid six figures for this book that the least they could do is spring for a paperback. Everyone knows paperbacks sell better than hardcovers, right? And shouldn’t every book have the chance to reach its audience at the best possible price?

But I’m ignorant. This is not how a publisher thinks these days.

The agent brought me up to speed:

Since the hardcover sold so poorly, no bookstore that checks the title’s Bookscan numbers will want to carry the paperback in the store. The book’s just doomed from the start. BUT…yeah, many books do tend to find their audiences after a while, and maybe this one will. Potential readers will have two species to draw from—the high-priced hardcover or the cheap e-book. The e-book’s cheaper than than the paperback would be, anyway. And, added the agent, both Author and Writer should content themselves with this state of affairs because we will continue to earn the higher, hardcover royalty. (Typically, publishers pay 10% on hardcovers, 7% on paper, so when Authors transition from hardcover to paper, they’re taking a cut in pay in the hopes of greater volume.)

So yay for us.

Right?

What do you think?

My Own Blind Spots

My Own Blind Spots   I haven’t had much time to post here lately. But Denise is on the road this weekend and boy, do I need to get stuff done around here. I can’t help thinking about how her recent success is rewriting the way I think about books. I see now that I’ve been a victim of my own blind spots in certain areas. Two things used to take as fact:   A. “No one comes to book signings”:  One of the sad-sack author memes talks about sitting at some table at a busy B&N, waiting for someone to come buy your book. Or showing up to give a talk somewhere and having only two people in the audience. I’ve been there. Not at the B&N maybe, but at a bunch of other stores up and down the east coast. In the past, we’ve sold our history titles at events like these and though the books did okay, I could never help having the feeling that we were wasting our time. If I have to drive out of town to give a talk on my own dime, how do I measure the benefit to me? If I have to educate someone about my book 50 times in an hour, how is this a good use of my time? I saw my predicament as an extension of the fact that the majority of people don’t read. They’d sooner buy a rake or a sandwich than a book.   But— people are showing up at Denise’s signings these days in droves. The angry little man inside me watches the hordes pack standing-room only bookstores and auditoriums, and thinks,  oh sure, now you come . But I shouldn’t judge. When I can quash the little man, I can manage to be both stunned and grateful.  Naturally  people come when they’ve heard about the book or the author. But some part of me wants them to understand that they’re only getting pitched a fraction of the books published each year. The imprimatur of the media does not mean you’re going to get a better read, just a better marketed one.   B. “No one buys hardcovers”:  This one is totally me. For years I’ve avoided buying hardcovers because of the cost. I bought paperbacks and used books instead. Who can fault me? More bang for your reading dollar, right?   But— watching all these people throw down $30 a pop for multiple copies of Denise’s book has made me realize that this frugal rule of mine is not shared by many. I’ve always been a heavy reader, and I needed to economize in order to stoke my habit. If you don’t read that many books in a year, springing for an occasional hardcover might well seem like a reasonable cost to you. A good number of people at signings are also seeking an autographed collectible for themselves or others. That’s cool. (I’m actually seeking to divest my shelves of signed books these days; I have too many.)  My no-hardcover rule was also formed in the pre-Amazon days. Back then, if I wanted to read a book that was only available as a shockingly overpriced $17.95 hardcover, I trained myself to wait for it. Today, there’s no reason to wait. That cost obstacle has been eliminated by Amazon, B&N, and ebooks. Rationally I’ve known this for a while, yet I have been weirdly living by my old rule. Still, someone  must  be buying hardcovers like Denise’s at indie bookstores, paying full price, or else the NYT Hardcover Bestseller List—theoretically culled from sales at multiple bookstores around the USA—would be 15 slots of blank space. Maybe this is simply an extension of point A, above: people shell out the premium bucks for the books they’ve heard about the most. Period.  Which somehow just depresses me further.

My Own Blind Spots

I haven’t had much time to post here lately. But Denise is on the road this weekend and boy, do I need to get stuff done around here. I can’t help thinking about how her recent success is rewriting the way I think about books. I see now that I’ve been a victim of my own blind spots in certain areas. Two things used to take as fact:

A. “No one comes to book signings”: One of the sad-sack author memes talks about sitting at some table at a busy B&N, waiting for someone to come buy your book. Or showing up to give a talk somewhere and having only two people in the audience. I’ve been there. Not at the B&N maybe, but at a bunch of other stores up and down the east coast. In the past, we’ve sold our history titles at events like these and though the books did okay, I could never help having the feeling that we were wasting our time. If I have to drive out of town to give a talk on my own dime, how do I measure the benefit to me? If I have to educate someone about my book 50 times in an hour, how is this a good use of my time? I saw my predicament as an extension of the fact that the majority of people don’t read. They’d sooner buy a rake or a sandwich than a book.

But—people are showing up at Denise’s signings these days in droves. The angry little man inside me watches the hordes pack standing-room only bookstores and auditoriums, and thinks, oh sure, now you come. But I shouldn’t judge. When I can quash the little man, I can manage to be both stunned and grateful. Naturally people come when they’ve heard about the book or the author. But some part of me wants them to understand that they’re only getting pitched a fraction of the books published each year. The imprimatur of the media does not mean you’re going to get a better read, just a better marketed one.

B. “No one buys hardcovers”: This one is totally me. For years I’ve avoided buying hardcovers because of the cost. I bought paperbacks and used books instead. Who can fault me? More bang for your reading dollar, right?

But—watching all these people throw down $30 a pop for multiple copies of Denise’s book has made me realize that this frugal rule of mine is not shared by many. I’ve always been a heavy reader, and I needed to economize in order to stoke my habit. If you don’t read that many books in a year, springing for an occasional hardcover might well seem like a reasonable cost to you. A good number of people at signings are also seeking an autographed collectible for themselves or others. That’s cool. (I’m actually seeking to divest my shelves of signed books these days; I have too many.)

My no-hardcover rule was also formed in the pre-Amazon days. Back then, if I wanted to read a book that was only available as a shockingly overpriced $17.95 hardcover, I trained myself to wait for it. Today, there’s no reason to wait. That cost obstacle has been eliminated by Amazon, B&N, and ebooks. Rationally I’ve known this for a while, yet I have been weirdly living by my old rule. Still, someone must be buying hardcovers like Denise’s at indie bookstores, paying full price, or else the NYT Hardcover Bestseller List—theoretically culled from sales at multiple bookstores around the USA—would be 15 slots of blank space. Maybe this is simply an extension of point A, above: people shell out the premium bucks for the books they’ve heard about the most. Period.

Which somehow just depresses me further.

THE GIRLS OF ATOMIC CITY ad in The New Yorker. Yes, The New Yorker

An advertisement for   The Girls of Atomic City   appears in this week’s issue of  The New Yorker .  This blew us away. The media hits on Denise’s book have been pretty good. Every day seems to bring a new one. By far, I think, the NPR interview ( which you can hear here ) did the most to announce the book, but there have been good reviews in   Shelf Awareness  ,   Book Page  ,   Geekadelphia  ,   USA Today  , and um, a few others that escape me at the moment. In the last couple of days there have also been: invites to do an Irish radio talk show, more US radio show interest, three TV appearance invites, not to mention creepy notes from freaky dudes checking out my wife online. (We reported you, a-hole). And there will be a few other media things happening in the cities she’s visiting this month (DC, NYC, Oak Ridge).  On the marketing side, this ad, and the ones running on Salon.com, are obviously the publisher’s doing.  Neither Denise nor I have ever gotten this much pub week press for a title of ours, so it’s really educational. I’m actually impressed by the impact that blogs can have on this. A lot of the enthusiastic bloggers turn out to be librarians or freelancers who go on to file their reviews with larger outlets, such the book trade press. And then they of course post those same reviews on Goodreads. It’s interesting also to see a lot of Atomic City “extended alumni”—people whose parents or grandparents worked at the site featured in the book are turning up as well.  So it’s been cool.  More later as I digest this all.  ***  Still cranking on my latest book. Going well. Not much else to report.

An advertisement for The Girls of Atomic City appears in this week’s issue of The New Yorker.

This blew us away. The media hits on Denise’s book have been pretty good. Every day seems to bring a new one. By far, I think, the NPR interview (which you can hear here) did the most to announce the book, but there have been good reviews in Shelf Awareness, Book Page, Geekadelphia, USA Today, and um, a few others that escape me at the moment. In the last couple of days there have also been: invites to do an Irish radio talk show, more US radio show interest, three TV appearance invites, not to mention creepy notes from freaky dudes checking out my wife online. (We reported you, a-hole). And there will be a few other media things happening in the cities she’s visiting this month (DC, NYC, Oak Ridge).

On the marketing side, this ad, and the ones running on Salon.com, are obviously the publisher’s doing.

Neither Denise nor I have ever gotten this much pub week press for a title of ours, so it’s really educational. I’m actually impressed by the impact that blogs can have on this. A lot of the enthusiastic bloggers turn out to be librarians or freelancers who go on to file their reviews with larger outlets, such the book trade press. And then they of course post those same reviews on Goodreads. It’s interesting also to see a lot of Atomic City “extended alumni”—people whose parents or grandparents worked at the site featured in the book are turning up as well.

So it’s been cool.

More later as I digest this all.

***

Still cranking on my latest book. Going well. Not much else to report.

Denise Kiernan. That's me.: Happy Pub Day

A post from my wife, Denise Kiernan, whose book, The Girls of Atomic City, is out today.

denisekiernan:

Happy Pub Day

It’s here—that day all authors wait for which, when it finally dawns, is one of the most anticlimactic career events ever, no matter how many times you go through it. Pub day.

Books are a long haul. You get a kernel of an idea, do a little digging and try to decide whether this is a topic you want to live with for years. Then of course there’s the business end of the entire endeavor which, if you’re like me, can’t be ignored if you want to make a living: Can I sell this to a publisher and can that publisher sell it to readers? 

So the kernel sprouts and you decide that you do want to live with the idea until you don’t and then until you can’t live without the idea again. Then there are the proposals and the meetings and all the while you’re trying to keep researching and come up with a clear vision for this project that you’ve already told major publishing corporations you really do have a vision for. Then you get the deal. Relief. Deadlines. A schedule. Sort of. An end date? In a sense, sure. 

You write. You rewrite. You keep researching. You turn in the first draft, which is maybe the most anticlimactic of all the anticlimatices. (New word! It’s one of those vertices you think you’ve reached but feel underwhelmed when you actually do.) You’re still so far from done and you know it. You wait for your editor. You already want to make changes the minute you hit “send” and your manuscript went out into the ether on its way to your editor. That’s fine. Changes are coming.

Your changes. The editor’s changes. Changes from those trusted colleagues you allowed to see your ugly, ugly first draft. Revisions and more drafts follow. The end is so much closer and you know now that the time to really whip things into shape is shrinking fast.

A first look at your cover blows a little wind up your skirt and you get excited again. A cover! It’s real!Do you like it? they ask. You do! You really do! You’re not just saying that to avoid sounding like a moody, picky writer with no design experience. Everyone weighs in. Then polite “suggestions” from the real power-wielders at any publishing house: sales. They don’t like the cover. Am I OK with that? Absolutely. After all, there are bigger fish in this fry-daddy.

First pass pages! Am I done? No. The copy editor has seen it, maybe a proofer.Only make necessary changes…Necessary. Never do writers have more trouble defining such a two-cent word than when they are instructed to make only “necessary” changes.

Pencil marks. Post-its. Use this pencil, not that one. You finish…sort of. You mail it in. You’re done!

No, you’re not.

Promotional materials. Second pass pages and galleys. The book is in print…sort of.Ugh..I could invent a drinking game based on the number of times I used the word (insert favorite adjective here)…I can’t believe I….Can I still change…? Your editor is about to hop on a plane and pry the pages from your cold dead hands. Promotional materials again. Web sites. Meetings. Lists of people you hope will give this book a second look. Finally, there are no more changes to be made. The book is off to the printer.

But you’re still not done. Wrangling for press, emailing, tweeting. Yay! I got a piece in yadda-yadda magazine! Boo! Whozeewhatsit doesn’t want to have me on their show! Yay! Boo! Wine.

Then, finally, on a rainy Tuesday, the book is officially out in the world. Sort of. Actually there has already been press. People have already been tweeting pics of the book after purchasing it BEFORE the pub date from stores that ignore those sort of contractual restrictions. Emails from friends and people I haven’t heard from in a while are, by far, the best part of this day, and I will answer every single one.

However, I’m still not done. I have talks to give, traveling to do, presentations to prepare (clothes to buy…) I open my laptop and try to get back to work. The inter-web sink hole drags me down into the neuro-pacification that is KenKen and I wander over to…

Hang on. What’s that a picture of…? Who isthatShe looks fascinating. She didwhat? When? Huh. You know what would be a great story…

And another kernel sprouts in the dark. Happy pub day.

***

I’ve been watching Denise’s march through the trad pub world with interest, comparing it to my own experiences in self-publishing. I’ll do a post on this shortly. I just want to collect my thoughts on it all.

Denise Kiernan. That's me.: The Next Big Thing

denisekiernan:

image

Recently, my husband, author Joseph D’Agnese, “tagged” me in his “The Next Big Thing” blog post. “Next Big Thing” works like this: one writer answers some questions about her next book and then passes that blog post along to other writers she knows, “tagging” them. (See end of this post for…